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A different approach to treatment-resistant tinnitus: pulsed radiofrequency to the ganglion C2.
Pieter Jacob Haasnoot,
Henk Maria Koning, Thijs Anton van Rheenen.
International Tinnitus Journal. 2012;17(1):97-99.

Abstract
Tinnitus represents one of the most common and distressing otologic problems, and it causes various somatic
and psychological disorders that interfere with the quality of life. Treatments for tinnitus include pharmacotherapy,
cognitive and behavioral therapy, sound therapy, music therapy, tinnitus retraining therapy, massage and stretching,
and electrical suppression. In this case report we present a potential treatment, namely pulsed radiofrequency to
the ganglion C2.


Percutaneous Radiofrequency Lesion of the Superior Cervical Sympathetic Ganglion in Patients. with Tinnitus
Henk M. Koning, MD, PhD*; Brigitte A. Dyrbye, MD*; Frits J. van Hemert, MD†
Pain Pract. 2015 Aug 27. doi: 10.1111/papr.12348.

Abstract
Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the
efficacy of radiofrequency lesioning of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion for patients with tinnitus.
Study Design: This is a retrospective long-term clinical
review of patients with tinnitus treated with a blockade of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion.
Setting: The human subjects were 366 consecutive patients
who came to the DC Klinieken in Almere and Amsterdam from January 2010 to January 2014 for consultations on their tinnitus that persisted for 1 month or longer.
Subjects and Methods: Data were recorded from patients
whose charts were reviewed retrospectively to identify the patients who were treated with a blockade of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion for tinnitus. An independent observer conducted a long-term follow-up assessment of the therapy by telephone interview.
Results: Relief of tinnitus at 7-week follow-up was achieved
in 64% of the patients treated with a radiofrequency lesion of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion after a positive test blockade of this structure. Two years after the treatment, the maintenance of a tinnitus relief occurred in almost 40% of the patients with a follow-up period of two years or longer.
Conclusions: A radiofrequency lesion of the superior
cervical sympathetic ganglion may be a useful alternative for patients with tinnitus not responding to conventional therapy.

 
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